Spring back To Action


Spring Back to Action

Research from the best minds in the automotive safety industry and the congressionally appointed head and neck committee study on concussions all agree. The circumference of the neck changes the way it reacts to forces applied to that area.

Test dummies are used to simulate a human in a collision whether it is by automobile or athletic playing sports.

How do they simulate neck strength in humans?

They change the size of the spring on the test dummies. Small to replicate a child’s neck circumference. Medium size for female adults and large for adult males.

To simulate an athlete’s neck you have to go one step further.  The athlete’s neck is simulated by the largest and most stiff spring in order to replicate the kinematics of a collision accurately.

The chairman of The Congressional Committee on Head and Spine Injuries (Concussions) agrees. In a research study, conducted by him, he stated; “the only way to represent an athletic neck was to fit the crash dummies with springs of large circumference”.  “It was the only way to show how an athlete would react in a collision”. The athlete’s neck in the study was the most resistant to changes in Delta forces or it changed the least. It deformed the least out of all the simulated necks.

If this is true for crash test dummies; is it not true for athletes playing sports that may include collisions.

 

 

 

 

If we increase the circumference of our athlete’s necks the same result should occur. Less deformation of the cervical spine.

If this is good for test dummies, it should be good for America’s athletes risking concussion during sports.

Congress calls concussions an American Epidemic. Let’s start inoculating our athletes with a larger, stronger neck.

 

 

The muscles of the head and neck must be trained to reduce concussive and subconcussive forces.

We need to make them stronger in the most efficient and safest manner available.

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